Undergraduate Programs

Bachelor of Science in Security Management

The major in Security Management concentrates on the analysis of security vulnerabilities and the administration of programs designed to reduce losses in public institutions and private corporations. The program prepares students for careers as managers, consultants and entrepreneurs. Applicants are required to submit an application through the CUNY Student Portal rather than submitting the John Jay Online application.

Curriculum

Learning Outcomes. Students will:

  • Critique and evaluate the origins and current structure of security management within corporations, not-for-profit institutions, and the government.
  • Discern and differentiate concepts of situational crime prevention, rational choice, theory, and criminological tenets to understanding crime and to evolving countermeasures for the control of loss and disorder.
  • Weigh and assess common areas of occupational proficiency for security executives: data protection, emergency planning and response, homeland defense, and legal liability.
  • Discover and apply tools to be effective in achieving those goals, particularly in areas where current practices are deficient, such as information protection, security technology, legal justice, and safety services.
  • Develop, support, and enhance writing and verbal communication skills through relevant classroom assignments.

Curriculum Courses


Required Courses (18 Credits)
Course Name
SEC 101: Introduction to Security
Course Description
An introduction to the historical, philosophical and legal basis of the security field. Overview of school and campus security, hospital security, housing security, etc. Security organizations, their policies and personnel are evaluated. Emphasis is placed on creating security awareness, relations with other organizations and security's place in the corporate structure.
Course Name
SEC 210: Methods of Security
Course Description
Methods and techniques used to prevent and reduce losses due to theft and casualty. Consideration of the security survey; communication and surveillance systems; control of personnel and visitors; the use, supervision, and training of security forces; handling civil disturbances in public buildings; and other emergencies.
Course Name
SEC 211: Security Management
Course Description
The organization of the security function and its administration will be emphasized. Selection, education, training, seminars and workshops for security personnel will be examined including techniques for gaining acceptance for new security programs. Contracting or leasing vs. direct supervision and outright purchase of security services and equipment will be compared. Problems in allocation, communications, assignment and span of control will be presented.
Course Name
SEC 270: Security of Computer and Their Data
Course Description
Methods that have been used in the past to steal with the aid of the computer will be examined. Case studies will be used. Methods of detecting computer fraud and physically protecting the computer and EDP systems will be stressed.
Course Name
SEC 315: Private Security and the Law
Course Description
This course is a comprehensive look at how private security and private sector justice are historically and structurally woven into the American experience. How the private security industry is legally governed, subject to regulatory and administrative oversight as well as guided by judicial decision are the primary aims of the course. Participants will be exposed to the foundational liability issues, from both a civil and criminal context, and critique and assess the nature of rights in the private sector domain. Special emphasis is given to the constitutional ramifications of private security action. The course fully outlines emerging case law and statutory directions regarding the industry, projects how the problems of entanglement between public and private law enforcement cause legal dilemmas, and ends with concrete suggestions on how to avoid liability problems.
Course Name
SEC 320: Private Security: Trends and Movements


Security Applications Electives (15 credits)
Course Name
FIS 106: Safety Engineering
Course Description
Course focuses on the work environment - its human, physical and environmental factors. Attention is given to achieving safety through hazard control, the laws of error, monitoring systems, accident analysis, promoting safety, OSHA, Workers' Compensation, fire prevention and fire safety
Course Name
FIS 104: Risk Management
Course Description
A study of fire insurance and risk, with the consideration of the background of the fire problem, insurance and financial institutions, development of rates, underwriting, grading schedules, the FAIR plan and roles of both government and private enterprise in the insurance industry.
Course Name
SEC 310: Emergency Planning
Course Description
This course provides a survey of the management issues posed by emergencies of all kinds, such as bomb threats, earthquakes, explosions, labor disputes and oil spills. Issues such as risk analysis, standards, countermeasures and emergency public relations will be studied, along with case histories.
Course Name
SEC 323: Private Security and Homeland Defense
Course Description
How the idea of homeland defense connects with private security and private sector justice is the chief aim of this course. In a more particular sense, the course reviews and analyzes threats to private infrastructure and interests, as well as planning for and responding to emergencies that affect both the private and public sectors. Topics covered include the impact of terrorism on the private sector, intelligence gathering and sharing between private and public security, and identification of various threats common to private security. Special emphasis is given to vulnerability analysis and risk management as well as suggestions on how public entities can partner with private sector justice in the defense of the homeland.
Course Name
SEC 327: Risk and Vulnerability Analysis
Course Description
The course assesses, evaluates and researches data by analyzing asset identification and classification and corresponding vulnerabilities, threat analysis and an effective baseline security program. The coverage will address a broad array of approved methodologies in the matter of risk and vulnerability including the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), Department of Defense (DOD), Department of State, Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and Department of Homeland Security (DHS) models. Specific facilities and industrial applications will be highlighted. The course culminates this analysis by recommended countermeasure methodologies which mitigate risk and threat.
Course Name
SEC 329: Security Risk Technology
Course Description
This course examines the security and surveillance technologies used in the private and public security sectors, looking in particular at: closed circuit television (CCTVs); workplace, home, and intimate partner surveillance technologies; police body cameras; and biometrics. Students will examine these technologies in a specially-configured security laboratory in order to learn how to use them in a multitude of settings. Special attention is also paid to the social, ethical, and legal implications of these technologies and new technologies, such as drones and Internet of Things devices.
Course Name
ENG 235: Writing for Management, Business, and Public Administration
Course Description
Development of the writing skills required for careers in law, business, civil service, or public administration. Extensive practice in the various forms of correspondence, inter-office memos, informal reports, minutes of meetings, summaries, briefings and presentations. Preparation of job application letters and resumes. Practice in proofreading, revising, editing. Development of reading comprehension through close study of business-related writings.
Course Name
SEC 342: Energy Industry Security
Course Description
The primary purpose of this course is to explore energy and infrastructure security. The synergy between homeland defense and energy security will be fully examined. The course will review and analyze threats to the critical infrastructure that is vital to energy distribution, as well as planning for and responding to emergencies that impact the energy sector. Other topics include internal sabotage, cyber-terrorism, nuclear industry security, and terrorism counter-measures. The goal of the course is to provide students with the knowledge necessary to critically evaluate and mitigate vulnerabilities and risks in the energy sector and its critical infrastructure.
Course Name
SEC 346: Retail and Commercial Security
Course Description
This course encompasses the breadth and depth of considerations involved in implementing general loss prevention concepts and security programs within a retail or commercial establishment. Strategies to prevent and reduce incidents of loss due to theft and other crimes, fire, harm from employees, as well as the ramifications of corporate mismanagement will be covered. Topics covered also include: mitigation strategies to reduce loss and pilferage, physical security systems, background investigations of employees, protection of sensitive information, internal dishonesty, and sensitivity to human rights of employees and the public.
Course Name
SEC 348: Security and Safety for Financial Institutions
Course Description
This course introduces the theory of providing security for financial institutions. Financial institution security refers to the various security measures for the purpose of protecting life and property, protecting the confidentiality of critical data and information and other financial assets. The course also reviews laws and regulations that guide security practices such as those promulgated by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and its Safeguards Rule among many other designs. This class will analyze the basics of this industry and review practical approaches to protecting them against threats such as theft, both internal and external, vandalism, data center security, cyber-crimes and fraud. Topics include the value of conducting a business impact analysis, conducting security audits, implementing security systems and interfacing with the public.
Course Name
SEC 350: Security in Art Museums and Cultural Institutions
Course Description
This course covers security and safety protocols for museums and cultural institutions. How do cultural institutions begin to secure and protect valuable art, documents, employees and visitors? Course coverage is expansive and includes internal theft, external concerns such as vandalism or irate patrons, as well as specific perimeter controls for the protection of valuable collections. The course will also delve into the possibility of violent acts or other deeds against art, landmarks and other cultural venues including natural disasters, fire and environmental hazards. Other topics include conducting a business impact analysis specifically for museums and cultural institutions, the design of security systems, security staffing, and standard operating procedures unique to museum and cultural institutions, as well as fire safety and business continuity issues and public accessibility management.
Course Name
SEC 352: Security Investigations and Consulting
Course Description
This course examines the diverse investigative functions that are unique to the private security domain yet complimentary to public law enforcement. Aside from the generic investigative tasks, such as interview and interrogation, witnesses and evidence collection, report writing and other documentation, the course targets those realms common to the private security sector by stressing investigative function within theft and other property offenses, insurance, fraud, employment and personnel crime and drugs in the workplace. The course culminates with advice on how a security office should be structured and how a security consulting business, using these investigative tools, might be built into a profitable enterprise.


Internship (3 Credits)
Course Name
SEC 378: Internship in Security Management
Course Description
*Students who are currently employed in law enforcement or security may be exempt for this requirement. Contact the major coordinator for evaluation.*

The security management internship will allow students to apply the knowledge and skills learned in the classroom to a workplace experience. Opportunities typically are available in private security guard and investigative businesses, corporate security and loss prevention departments of large enterprises, and crime control units within law enforcement. Interns meet for at least 15 hours of class time with a faculty member as well as complete at least 96 hours in the field.


Senior Seminar (3 Credits)
Course Name
SEC 405: Seminar in Security Problems
Course Description
A professional seminar on major security problems in the private, public and institutional sectors. Legal liability and its control will be emphasized. Students will either analyze an existing or plan an original security program.

* Transfer Credits: John Jay College awards academic credit for many law enforcement training programs. Students with law enforcement backgrounds may be able to graduate in as little as 18 months.

Requirements

Applicants are required to have an Associates Degree prior to submitting an application. Applicants will be categorized as a Transfer Student rather than an incoming Freshman. As a college within the City University of New York, John Jay College of Criminal Justice welcomes many transfer students every year - students who have already earned college credits.

As part of your application, you will need to submit your college transcripts so that we my identify which credits will transfer. To receive a degree from John Jay College, you must take a minimum of 30 credits at the College, including at least 50 percent of an approved major or specialization.

To get started with your application, please click here